Q&A with Peter Wadhams

Peter Wadhams, Professor of Ocean Physics and Head of the Polar Ocean Physics Group in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physic at the University of Cambridge, looks at sea ice models, how to improve them, and how to improve the quality of the IPCC’s assessment reports.

Inuk - Feature Film by Mike Magidson

Actually filmed in 2010 this 90 minutes movie took a long road to the festivals. I'm not going to repeat this exciting story, because all of it was captured already here: The Evening Class Interview With Mike Magidson. Instead here is an excerpt of an IMDB critic written by Cameron McAllister:

Greenland's icy landscape is both chilling and mesmerizing. I cannot begin to imagine how difficult filming must have been for any crew members that were not from the area. Nonetheless, the film is shot and edited exceptionally; a fact that enough people agreed on to award it Best Narrative Feature, Best Director and Best Editing at the 2011 Savannah Film Festival.

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Chasing Ice

Chasing Ice is the story of one man’s mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of climate change. Using time-lapse cameras, his videos compress years into seconds and capture ancient mountains of ice in motion as they disappear at a breathtaking rate.

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Video: Arctic Infrared

Just an attempt to follow sea ice dynamics and escape Arctic winter darkness. Source video should be available from the Vimeo page in case you miss frame by frame playback. First frame is dated 2013-01-15. I'll try to update it once per week or so.

Jennifer Francis and The Arctic Paradox

Jennifer Francis makes a great job drawing a line from sea ice retreat to slower moving weather patterns on the northern hemisphere. Probably it is strongly against common sense to accept colder winter and more snow as an aspect of global warming, but eventually even a room full of meteorologists absorbs the message - if properly presented.

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Are you ready for the real Weather Report?

Acting by Pippa Mackie and Kai Nagata, written by Heather Libby and filmed at Strut Studios in Vancouver. More: deeprogueram.tumblr.com/

The Devil's Symphony

Creepy sounds from an intact ice pack uploaded by NOAAPMEL.

Subtext: These sounds of the movement Arctic sea ice pack have been called "The Devil's Symphony" by early Arctic explorers. The sounds you hear were captured by hydrophones on moorings deployed in Bering Strait during winter of 2011-2012, and are the same as those so vividly described by early Arctic explorers. See www.pmel.noaa.gov/arctic/rediscover/ & www.arctic.noaa.gov/aro/russian-american/

Melting in Barents Sea and Kara Sea

Above are the last 100 days of the European Sector animated using a cloud-free algorithm. Especially the Kara Sea is worth to look at - it became ice free within a few days. Unfortunately Fram Strait was mostly covered by clouds and the mass export is not visible. Make sure to switch to the high resolution version (1280x720) and go fullscreen.

Credit goes to the NASA Rapid Response Team

TV AD: Are We Ready to Drill in the Arctic Ocean?

This TV advertisement aired in the D.C. market on This Week, Face the Nation, Meet the Press, and State of the Union on December 4. It also will air during the week of December 5-9 on Morning Joe, The Daily Show, and Rachel Maddow.

PewEnvironment.org: Are We Really Ready to Drill in America's Arctic Ocean?

Ice + Seals = Polar Bears

Via: Simple Equation Predicts Doom for Polar Bears

Timelapse Ice Video from Murmansk to Dudinka Port

2 years old - still awesome. Enjoy this day and night trip from Murmansk to Dudinka Port via Barents Sea, White Sea, Pechora Sea, Kara Strait, Kara Sea, Yenisei Gulf, Yenisei River. All timelapses were photographed at temperatures from -30C to -50C, you can notice "boiling" water when icebreaker unseals ice armor.

Music -"Circle" from "Contact Note" by Jon Hopkins, 2004

More timelapse videos here.

See Thick Ice vanishing in the Beaufort Gyre

credit: NOAA

NOAA climate service animation based on the work of James Maslanik, Colorado, showing ice age distribution beginning January 1987 through mid-summer 2011. The Beaufort Gyre no longer fosters multiyear ice, instead it is now a dangerous place for old and thick ice.

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Animation of the Sea Ice Melting Season 2011

Above animation starts with a full image of the Arctic mosaic taken first week of May and then updates all cloud free parts day by day and frame by frame. Although it looks quite real, every single frame is actually a patchwork of multiple days.

During the first half the animation profits from the clear sky conditions, now at the end of the season clouds and low pressure system are coming back and the last frame dated as of yesterday shows far too much ice. Now we depend on radar and microwave images depicting the real extent of the Arctic ...

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Striking Web Cam Video of Arctic Sea Ice Melting in Beaufort Sea

This web cam might become a sea floor humpback whale cam soon. The battery will acclaim bathing in warm Atlantic bottom layer, too bad the Iridium network does not support offshore underwater operation.

What happened to Sea Ice last Winter?

Since 10 days sea ice extent is falling of the cliff. Over the course of June it showed already little difference to 2010. Now it even starts with steeper decrement compared to 2007 into July. Most likely the extent will drop below 8 Msqkm today or tomorrow.

Most weather models calculate the high pressure system over Arctic Ocean for another week with less power, though. Since the Nares Strait is virtually open, the overall ice drift direction targets the region from there to Fram Strait and Barenst Sea. In short: strong multi-year ice seeks warm Atlantic.

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Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R) Floor Speech: America is an Arctic Nation

Comprehensive and condensed speech (10min), 90% about opportunities, 5% environment, 5% risks.

Script: Last week I was honored to participate in a historic trip...

Video: Sea Ice Coverage from 1978 to 2008

Description: This video shows the changes in Arctic sea ice coverage from 1978 to 2008. It was developed by Ignatius G. Rigor at the University of Washington, Seattle Applied Physics Lab.

The pulses depict the annual expansion and contraction of the sea ice from winter to summer. Pay attention to how much ice coverage there is in 1978 compared with the video's end in 2008. The red dots represent the buoys that measure the ice.

Looks like multi-year-ice plugs Fram Strait very well.

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