ERMA releases Arctic Reponse Planning Tool

credit: ERMA

One consequence of the Deepwater Horizon disaster is the insight to have all available geo information available in one place is not only good thing, but also a measure to avoid left hand not knowing what right hand doing.

So, just in time and days before the Shell armada starts drilling in the Chukchi Sea the federal mapping tool that aided first responders in Gulf spill expanded to the Arctic. (press release)

NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco said: “The addition of Arctic ERMA will be a tremendous benefit to responders in this rapidly developing region. This scientific tool could provide essential information in responding to potential oil spills and pollution releases in the Arctic.”

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NOOA's Climate Report 2011 - Arctic Chapter

The peer-reviewed report, issued in coordination with the American Meteorological Society (AMS), was compiled by 378 scientists from 48 countries around the world. It provides a detailed update on global climate indicators, notable weather events and other data collected by environmental monitoring stations and instruments on land, sea, ice and sky.

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Greenland Report November 2011

This report from last November remained a while in the local pipeline before getting blogged. It is a comprehensive and dense reading. Also it it is one of the longest - in terms of scrolling - webpage ever seen. I chose to zoomify it to get an overview and at a first glance I recognized all charts are going down. Except - still naturally - surface mass balance along the K-transect over elevation.

Everybody equipped with good pattern matching wetware will see a link to the sea ice extent graphs of the years 2007 and 2010.

Here are both highlights and a link of the report:

  • Total ice sheet mass loss in 2011 was 70% larger than the 2003-09 average annual loss rate of -250 Gt y-1. According to satellite gravity data obtained since 2002, ice sheet mass loss is accelerating.
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